Anabolic or Catabolic! How to Avoid Overtraining!

by Bartek



Anabolic or Catabolic! How to Avoid Overtraining!

Dear Mark,

I'm writing with regard to the high intensity training program that you recommend on your excellent website.

So far, I've tried rope-jumping and sprints, and I have to admit these exercises kick ass!

They're both effective and easy to squeeze into a busy schedule.

However, I would like to work on my pecks a little during the upcoming summer holidays.

On your website, I came across your training program which consists of the above-mentioned exercises: bench-pressing, rope-jumping and sprinting.

One thing that struck me was that it took you less than 40 minutes a week to undergo this exercise regimen.

My question is: Would it be a good idea to spend more than 15 minutes lifting weights?

If it's too much for a single exercise, would adding another one to a training session yield even better results?

What do you think about exercising longer than advised?

My goal is not to become a gorilla, as I'm not so keen to work out in the gym all the time, but in addition to giving my testosterone a boost I would like to improve my body.

Did your training program help you to look more athletic?

Anabolic or Catabolic! How to Avoid Overtraining!

Hi Bartek,

Keep in mind that most of the men who visit this site come here with broken bodies.

Bodies that do not produce testosterone at optimal levels.

When I write my content, I always write with these men in mind.

All through my 30's I played a minimum of 7 hours of beach volleyball a week, lifted weights, swam, cycled, ran, etc...

During this period, I was going way beyond the short intense workouts I recommend here, and was just doing fine.

But...

If I had attempted the same activity level at 42, when my testosterone levels were in the basement, it would have been a much different story.

My reservoir wasn't as deep at 30 as it was at 40.

Pushing that hard with my imperfect body would have sent me into a catabolic state.

Most of the men who come here fall into this category...

They're undernourished hormonally and hormonally undernourished bodies react to excessive exercise by releasing the catabolic, muscle eating hormone, cortisol.

And chronically elevated cortisol leads to...

Decreased testosterone production, loss of muscle mass, weakened immunity, reduced bone formation, short term memory loss, increased blood pressure, weight gain, and decreased vasodilation of the blood vessels, which can contribute to erectile dysfunction.

Anabolic or Catabolic! How to Avoid Overtraining!

So, in answer to your question if it's OK to work out more....

It depends!

If your tank is running on empty, intense sessions that exceed 20 minutes or so, may be counter productive.

You'll know you've crossed the threshold if after your workout you become fatigued, lethargic, moody, and irritable.

You'll also fail to hold onto your pump, which is a clear signal that you've slipped into the catabolic zone.

Remember...

You should feel emotionally invigorated after a workout session.

You may be somewhat tired, but you shouldn't feel moody, irritable, or emotionally drained.

My suggestion to you is, try a few longer workouts.

If your moods are stable, and you're successful in building new muscle mass, no worries at all.

If not, cut back until you find your sweet spot.

That zone where you maintain supreme fitness, without sacrificing the hormones your body needs.

Good luck!

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